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Awesome

#3
I heard about this and Im so excited imaginig what scenario could happen ... who know maybe we find aliens maybe we tranfer there... I feel like a dreaming kid
 

Uriel

\\\ Night Watch ///
Member
Warteam Member
Donator
#5
when you reach the speed of light, it was only 39 years trip.:D
And how lond its take in WARP 5???



The best is the view from the surface of one of the planet, They are so close each other that you can see other three planets like a moon size on the day sky!!!!
 
#9
The bad thing is we dont have any type of hyper propulsion, but NASA 's engeneers has aready made anti-matter engine but the fact is that it is so powerfull that it can destroy earth in case it get activated near it, now they are testing first ion engine which is still a prototype. The way to travell fast is im the matter fusion which we are currently unavelable to made and use
 

GammaDeltaII

RiddleBox
Retired Admin
#10
Keep on dreaming :p Voyager 1, which was launched in 1977 (almost 40 years ago), is currently the farthest spacecraft from Earth at "only" 138 AU. To put that into perspective, 1 ly = 63241 AU :)

The use of antimatter for propulsion is currently sci-fi and I don't think it will ever become a realistic option. So far, scientists have only been able to produce a couple of nanograms, which — as I read somewhere — wouldn't even be enough to boil water for a cup of tea :D Besides, it is extremely expensive to produce and storage of any "large" quantities also poses difficulties.

Ion thrusters are not new; they have been used for a long time for deep-space missions and for small attitude or orbital adjustments and orbital transfers. They have high specific impulse, but very low thrust (i.e. very low acceleration), so they may be efficient, but it takes very long to get anywhere.

Propulsion based on nuclear fusion is indeed an interesting option, but that's also sci-fi for now. If at some time in the far future it would be possible to sustain a stable fusion reaction with a positive net energy output, there's still the problem that the reactor will most likely be way too large and heavy to be feasible for spacecraft propulsion.
 
#12
Keep on dreaming :p Voyager 1, which was launched in 1977 (almost 40 years ago), is currently the farthest spacecraft from Earth at "only" 138 AU. To put that into perspective, 1 ly = 63241 AU :)

The use of antimatter for propulsion is currently sci-fi and I don't think it will ever become a realistic option. So far, scientists have only been able to produce a couple of nanograms, which — as I read somewhere — wouldn't even be enough to boil water for a cup of tea :D Besides, it is extremely expensive to produce and storage of any "large" quantities also poses difficulties.

Ion thrusters are not new; they have been used for a long time for deep-space missions and for small attitude or orbital adjustments and orbital transfers. They have high specific impulse, but very low thrust (i.e. very low acceleration), so they may be efficient, but it takes very long to get anywhere.

Propulsion based on nuclear fusion is indeed an interesting option, but that's also sci-fi for now. If at some time in the far future it would be possible to sustain a stable fusion reaction with a positive net energy output, there's still the problem that the reactor will most likely be way too large and heavy to be feasible for spacecraft propulsion.
In fact I'm dreaming ^^ I would like to happen so which does not mean that it will be realistic ;) but you know scientists promise lot of thing but the real deal is how many of them are able to been realized in now days